International Programmes

Disaster relief and sustainable development projects are at the core of Mercy Relief’s International Programmes. Our first disaster response team was deployed in 2003 to Bahorok in North Sumatra, Indonesia, when it was hit by devastating flash floods. Since then, we have continued to work alongside survivors to restore lives and livelihoods, and to invest in communities throughout Asia to improve living standards.

At Mercy Relief, we are always thinking about how we can get better at what we do. We draw on technology and innovation, as well as creative partnerships with other organisations to help us come up with better and more effective solutions to the challenges we face.

We also document our field experiences and publish them in reports for various stakeholders – it is our way of sharing what we have learnt in the hope that others will benefit from it.

Where We Work

Building Resilient Communities

In the aftermath of disasters, communities often come to the grim realization that surviving is only the beginning. The road ahead is an uphill journey to reinstate a sense of normalcy into their lives, both physically and psychologically. Despite its challenges, the recovery phase proves to be a critical period in ensuring communities are empowered to be key change agents in building resiliency.

Disaster Management Cycle


Preparedness

EXAMPLE 1 – PREPAREDNESS

MOUNT MERAPI COMMUNITY BASED DISASTER
RISK MANAGEMENT PROGRAMME (INDONESIA 2009)

Mercy Relief constructed 2 evacuation centres for the vulnerable   communities of Dukun sub-district, who were living on the slopes of an active volcano (Mount Merapi) in Central Java. The centres feature central kitchens and improved sanitation facilities within two schools in Dukun. We conducted public healthcare and hygiene workshops, and implemented early warning systems and evacuation drills for 4,700 villagers. All to enhance the communities’ preparedness against Indonesia’s most active volcano.

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EXAMPLE 2 – RESPONSE

TYPHOON HAIYAN RELIEF (PHILIPPINES 2013)

Mercy Relief sent 6 relief missions and 1 medical team across 7 provinces in the Visayas Region that were affected by Super Typhoon Haiyan. In that time 21,000 relief food packs were distributed and 6 mobile water purification systems were deployed to meet the basic survival needs of affected communities. $1.5 million was raised to support communities during both the acute relief and the ongoing rehabilitation projects.
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Preparedness
Preparedness

EXAMPLE 3 – RECOVERY

TRANSITIONAL SHELTERS PROJECT (NEPAL EARTHQUAKE 2015)

Mercy Relief completed 690 transitional housing shelters and 29 temporary classrooms as part of rehabilitative efforts to house the affected communities through monsoon season and reinstate a sense of normalcy and togetherness post-disaster. 3,450 villagers and over 2,200 students benefited from the project.

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EXAMPLE 4 – MITIGATION

HEALTH, WATER AND LIVELIHOOD SUPPORT (PHILIPPINES 2010)

Mercy Relief worked with 466 households in Zambales, Philippines, to plant mangrove seedlings along five hectares of shoreline to establish natural nurseries for fishes to spawn and increase villagers’ catch. Once matured, the mangroves act as a natural barrier against storm surges during typhoon season. What’s more, two community managed water systems and herbal farms were implemented to improve communal health and sanitation.

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Preparedness

Areas of Focus

LIVELIHOOD

Livelihood programmes are necessary so communities can be self-reliant, and individuals can earn sufficient income without negatively impacting the environment.

Livelihood programmes includes organising social enterprises within urban poor communities, demo farms and oyster farming.

SHELTER

Shelter provides security, safety and protection from the elements and enhances resistance to disease. A proper habitat lays the foundation for a decent standard of living.

Shelter programmes include reconstruction of communal facilities such as hospitals, clinics, schools and transitional shelters.

EDUCATION

We believe that creating and improving access to better education is one of the most effective ways to combat poverty. A number of our projects are aimed at achieving this through enhancing the skills and knowledge of teachers, and providing educational resources for schools.

Educational programmes include training educators in teaching English, financial literacy for rural farmers and special needs training.

WATER & SANITATION

Access to safe and clean water is a critical aspect of community development. Effective sanitation systems and a sound hygiene culture are vital to reducing environmental health risks and the burden of disease. Properly processed waste can also be used as an alternative energy source, or as fertiliser in agricultural production.

WatSan programmes includes construction of potable water sources, increasing access of potable water to rural communities and construction of communal sanitation facilities.

 healthcare

HEALTHCARE

Our healthcare projects are aimed at increasing life expectancy and improving quality of life. This is done by enhancing medical infrastructure and systems, reducing the risks and burden of disease, and strengthening the skills and knowledge of healthcare workers.

Healthcare programmes includes midwivery trainings, malnutrition programmes and medical equipment and training to rural hospitals.

WATER & SANITATION

Access to safe and clean water is a critical aspect of community development. Effective sanitation systems and a sound hygiene culture are vital to reducing environmental health risks and the burden of disease. Properly processed waste can also be used as an alternative energy source, or as fertiliser in agricultural production.

WatSan programmes includes construction of potable water sources, increasing access of potable water to rural communities and construction of communal sanitation facilities.

 healthcare

HEALTHCARE

Our healthcare projects are aimed at increasing life expectancy and improving quality of life. This is done by enhancing medical infrastructure and systems, reducing the risks and burden of disease, and strengthening the skills and knowledge of healthcare workers.

Healthcare programmes includes midwivery trainings, malnutrition programmes and medical equipment and training to rural hospitals.

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